Non-Fiction

Zero Debt by Neeraj Deginal #BookReview

Do you want to secure a safe financial future for yourself and for your family, but don’t know how to go about it?

Have you ever felt that everyone else is richer than you, just because they have a pocketful of credit cards?

Have you ever believed that stock markets are for the lion hearted, and are more riskier than a fixed deposit?

“Zero Debt: Break the Debt Cycle and Reclaim Your Life” by Neeraj Deginal is a book for the finance newbies. The ones who are not blessed to have selected Commerce in 11th grade, but still need to manage their finances properly.

Basically, this book is a primer on how to manage the money you earn and not have pending EMIs and credit card statements sitting on your head at the end of every month.

The author, Neeraj Deginal, speaks about his own experience of being overdependent on credit. EMI after EMI, loan after loan, all in search for the “supposed” perfect financial future and social image. After all, eating out every Saturday and being seen with the right people at the right places makes all the difference, right?

The author writes about the errors of this way of thinking, and the various steps one can take to reverse this thought pattern. He states that frugality and minimalism is not a bad thing, if it secures you a good financial future.

A few problems that I had with the book (as I always do): the structure of the book was a bit off. The author lists down his experience first in its entirety, and then gives his advice and thoughts about it. And in some chapters, the order gets mixed up. I personally felt that each chapter could have begun with the author’s experience pertaining to one topic, what he learnt from it, and how the reader could learn something from his experience. Also, at times the solutions seem too commonplace (though a sentence in the ‘copyright’ section of the book does give a disclaimer to this effect). Hence, the reader could be pressed to search for more diverse solutions to suit his/her own problems.

Also, the language is a bit too simplistic for my liking. The grammar and choice of words is off the mark at times. If you’re willing to overlook these intricacies for the sake of learning how to manage your personal finance, the book will be an okay place to start.

Moreover, there were no quotes or tips from financial advisers, which could have lent more credibility to the book.

I give this book 2.5 stars, and recommend it only to people who have zero understanding of personal finance management.

Zero Debt Review

Note: I have received a fee for providing my honest review about this book. Thank you for your support!

 

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